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Trends containing "Government Regulation"

354 /hr. F.D.A. Will Propose New Regulations for E-Cigarettes

The federal government is also proposing to include cigars and tobacco pipes under its regulatory control. - 1 day, 3 hours

/hr. Russia Blocks Access to Major Independent News Sites

Russia's government has escalated its use of its Internet censorship law to target news sites, bloggers, and politicians under the slimmest excuse of preventing unauthorized protests and enforcing house arrest regulations. Today, the country's ISPs have received orders to block a list of major news sites and system administrators have been instructed to take the servers providing the content offline. -

/hr. Court Deals Huge Blow To Net Neutrality

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday struck down the government's latest effort to require internet providers to treat all traffic the same and give consumers equal access to lawful content, a policy that supporters call net neutrality. The Federal Communications Commission did not have the legal authority to enact the 2011 regulations, which were challenged in a lawsuit brought by Verizon Communications Inc, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said in its ruling. -

/hr. End of the line for the lead bullet? Regulations, bans force switch to 'green' ammo

The U.S. government is getting the lead out…literally. -

/hr. Uruguay set to become first country to legalize marijuana trade

By Malena Castaldi MONTEVIDEO (Reuters) - Uruguay's Senate is expected to pass a law on Tuesday making the small South American nation the world's first to allow its citizens to grow, buy and smoke marijuana. The pioneering government-sponsored bill establishes state regulation of the cultivation, distribution and consumption of marijuana and is aimed at wresting the business from criminals. Uruguayans would also be allowed to grow up to six plants of marijuana in their homes a year, or as much as 480 grams (about 17 ounces). Uruguay's attempt to undo drug trafficking is being followed closely in Latin America where the legalization of some narcotics is being increasingly seen by regional leaders as a possible way to end the violence spawned by the cocaine trade. -

/hr. Obama Faces Backlash Over Trade Deal

WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration appears to have almost no international support for controversial new trade standards that would grant radical new political powers to corporations, increase the cost of prescription medications and restrict bank regulation, according to two internal memos obtained by The Huffington Post. The memos, which come from a government involved in the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade negotiations, detail continued disputes in the talks over the deal. -

/hr. "Constitution" Rally Truckers Slow Beltway Traffic

Dozens of drivers of tractor-trailers and pickup trucks expressed their frustration over trucking industry regulations and the government shutdown Friday in a way that was guaranteed to get attention:... -

/hr. "A Corporate Trojan Horse": Obama Pushes Secretive TPP Trade Pact, Would Rewrite Swath of U.S. Laws

As the federal government shutdown continues, Secretary of State John Kerry heads to Asia for secret talks on a sweeping new trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The TPP is often referred to by critics as "NAFTA on steroids," and would establish a free trade zone that would stretch from Vietnam to Chile, encompassing 800 million people — about a third of world trade and nearly 40 percent of the global economy. While the text of the treaty has been largely negotiated behind closed doors and, until June, kept secret from Congress, more than 600 corporate advisers reportedly have access to the measure, including employees of Halliburton and Monsanto. "This is not mainly about trade," says Lori Wallach, director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. "It is a corporate Trojan horse. The agreement has 29 chapters, and only five of them have to do with trade. The other 24 chapters either handcuff our domestic governments, limiting food safety, environmental standards, financial regulation, energy and climate policy, or establishing new powers for corporations." -

/hr. 90 Nations Sign UN Arms Treaty, But Canada Refuses

OTTAWA - The Harper government faced sharp criticism Wednesday for its continued refusal to sign a landmark treaty to regulate the global arms trade.A group of non-governmental agencies, called the Control Arms Coalition, said it was frustrated and disappointed that the government did not follow the United States and more than 90 other countries in signing the Arms Trade Treaty.Meanwhile, the federal NDP accused the government of indulging in conspiracy theories because it continues to express concern that the treaty might have an impact on lawful gun owners within Canada.The criticism was unleashed after Secretary of State John Kerry signed the treaty on behalf of the U.S. on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly.Kerry called it a "significant step" in keeping the world safe.And he shot back at political opponents, saying that the treaty would have no effect on domestic gun ownership inside the U.S., where there is strong concern that it could violate the cherished rights of Americans to bear arms."This treaty will not diminish anyone's freedom," Kerry said, adding that the U.S. "would never think about supporting a treaty that is inconsistent with ... the rights of American citizens to be able to exercise their guaranteed rights under our Constitution."Kerry's view appears to differ sharply from those expressed by the Harper government on the issue.Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird has said there is a potential link between signing on to the treaty and Canada's now-abolished long gun registry.Baird's spokesman said earlier this week that the government is still doing consultations on whether the treaty would affect lawful recreational firearms owners in Canada."It is past time for Canada to get beyond spurious claims that the treaty will affect legal Canadian gun-owners and join the states that want to save lives by ending irresponsible arms transfers," Ken Epps of the group Project Ploughshares said in a statement.Project Ploughshares is a member of the Canadian coalition, along with Oxfam Canada, Oxfam Quebec and Amnesty International.NDP foreign affairs critic Paul Dewar said he was shocked that the U.S., which has a much tougher gun lobby, has signed the treaty before Canada."The fact that the government continues to refuse to sign the treaty indicates a preference for conspiracy theories over the simple truth: this is a treaty that will help save the lives of millions of civilians around the world and it has no impact on domestic owners of firearms," Dewar said in an email."Today's signature by the United States just makes it more obvious that the Conservatives are making this decision based on gun-lobby ideology and not reality."Robert Fox, executive director of Oxfam Canada, urged the government to sign the treaty without delay."Every day, conventional arms are used to commit serious acts of violence against women and girls, including rape," Fox said in a statement."We are deeply disappointed that Canada has not signed the treaty as this undermines our ability to champion women's rights, peace and security."Prime Minister Stephen Harper was at a United Nations panel on maternal and child health on Wednesday, while Baird was to expected to speak later in the day on the issue of the forced marriage of children.It is not clear what impact the treaty would have in curbing the global arms trade, estimated at between $60 billion and $85 billion annually. Much will depend on which countries ratify it, and how stringently it is implemented once it comes into force.The treaty will not control the domestic use of weapons in any country.It prohibits the transfer of conventional weapons if they violate arms embargoes or if they promote acts of genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes, and if they could be used in attacks on civilians or civilian buildings such as schools and hospitals.The treaty covers battle tanks, armoured combat vehicles, large-calibre artillery systems, combat aircraft, attack helicopters, warships, missiles and missile launchers, and small arms and light weapons.It would require ratifying country to establish national regulations to control the transfer of conventional arms and components and to regulate arms brokers.— with files from the Associated Press -

/hr. UPDATED: Lengthy Senate report details EPA FOIA abuses | WashingtonExaminer.com

Environmental Protection Agency officials have from the beginning of President Obama's tenure in the Oval Office pursued a path of obfuscation, operating in the shadows, and out of the sunlight, according to a Senate report. The report by Republican members of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee provides a detailed description of violations of the Freedom of Information Act and other federal laws and regulations meant to encourage transparency and accountability in the government. The agency established an alias identity to hide the actions of the former administrator; has purposefully been unresponsive to FOIA request, oftentimes redacting information the public has a right to know; and mismanaged its electronic records system such that federal records have been jeopardized, the report said. -